Evaluating 
Resiliency
 Initiatives
 for
 Children
 and
 Youth: Current 
Issues,
 Lingering 
Questions, 
and
 Future 
Directions

People Using Scales

Kimberly Schonert Reichl writes that: Across a variety of fields, from education to health promotion, recent years have witnessed a surge in the development and implementation of programs aimed at promoting resiliency and reducing risk among children and adolescents (see Blueprints for Violence Prevention, www.colorado.edu/cspv/blueprints/; the Prevention Research Center for Human Development at Penn State; and the Collaborative for Academic, and Social and Emotional Learning’s Safe and Sound Guide, www.casel.org, for some examples). In tandem with this growth in the number and variety of resiliency promoting programs, there has been a burgeoning literature delineating the importance of obtaining “evidence” of a program’s effectiveness (Botvin, 2004; Greenberg et al., 2003). Indeed, with ever increasing demands for accountability, it appears that we can no longer rely on our “common sense” or “good hunches” in knowing what works and what does not. Instead, it is necessary that we obtain scientific “evidence” regarding a program’s efficacy or effectiveness.

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